Netral YouTube highlights: Haru Biru  

Just under four minutes in duration, it showcases the Indonesian cult band Netral, as they perform Haru Biru. The video kicks off with a menacing synth rhythm counting down to the actual performance that gets going at 0:30. There are shots of street scenes in urban Indonesia, with crowds of motorbikes roaring along to convey a chaotic atmosphere. Against this backdrop we see the individual band members appearing to be suitably angst-ridden.
Netral's performance starts with a slightly discordant, jerky guitar riff, building up to a refrain consisting of bellowed shouts. You could imagine them performing this in a sweaty club somewhere, with their devoted fans inspired to punch the air in time with the song!
The band themselves are spotted chasing manically along city streets and alleys, sometimes stopping to wrap their arms despairingly around their heads. This footage is interspersed with clips from a live performance, where the drummer is sporting a severe Mohican haircut - which is appropriate for the grinding punk rock being played.
But at 1:18 the melodrama fades slightly, and Netral burst into a pleasant melody. This contrasts very well with the more aggressive verses and their ‘shoutalong' parts. At the same time as these sections of the song are being played, with various band members tearing along the road, an animated graphic of lurid red graffiti follows them closely. This is a particularly effective image. Graffiti is obviously, by its very nature, a type of artwork that is static. But the director's idea of animating the bold aerosol lines and have them pursuing the guys from the band is extremely creative. It is particularly effective when the vocalist raises his head to laugh scornfully towards the skies, while the red ‘ink' flows up around his face, almost as if he is being wreathed by flames.
This use of brightly-coloured red lines is enhanced by the musicians also being spotted wearing red t-shirts. While they dash along streets, under subways or through bustling street markets, they always stand out boldly, as the background tone is kept deliberately drab. Most of the backdrop appears to be awash in tones of grey.
An interesting break kicks in at 2:34. As a light swings above the trio, the music spirals off into a discordant middle-eight, with ringing minor key organ notes being driven along by furiously percussive drumming. This eventually cuts to a more melodic bass part. Again, the red graffiti trails after the protagonists in the video, snaking across the grey landscape, while the guitar eventually comes back to play harmonics that create a suitably eerie atmosphere. If the guys aren't running down alleyways in the video, they're performing some very agile urban gymnastics, filmed in slow motion.
The outro consists of the punchy chorus being repeated to terrific effect, while the solitary spotlight swinging above the band seems to increase in momentum in synchronization with the song. As special mention is due to the drummer, who keeps the jaunty track's momentum going along right to the end, with some furious rhythm punctuated by deftly-performed drum rolls.
The directing credits for this film go to Slim F and Sunu.